The Alamo

The Alamo and the history behind it easily belong among the most iconic historical pieces of Texas and San Antonio history.  The Battle of the Alamo in 1836 proved a decisive battle in the Texas Revolution. Though the Battle itself ended in a Mexican victory, word of Mexican general Santa Anna’s cruelness reached Texan settlers and encouraged them to take arms against the army. Following the 13-day battle, the Mexican Army was defeated at San Jacinto a month later on April 21, 1836.

Shrine to Our Lady of Guadalupe: The Oblate Grotto

The Oblate Grotto is a massive and Catholic place of worship that can be found in San Antonio, Texas.  Regulars and passerbys can both on the dense spiritual presence felt at this place of worship. Unlike orthodox churches, the Oblate Grotto is a church that holds all of its events and services outside rather than behind closed doors. Attendees notice that this change can bring a huge wave of comfort and spiritual attachment to the site which only furthers the religious experience that the Grotto was meant to give.

The Grotto encompasses an area of five acres and in this space, there are two reconstructions of paramount religious events. The first is a recreation of Tepeyac Hill in Mexico and where Our Lady appeared before Saint Juan Diego as Our Lady of Guadalupe. During this meeting, Our Lady asked that a shrine be built in her name and there, Juan Diego received the beautiful image of Guadalupe to convince the bishop to construct the site.

The other religious location is the resemblance to Lourdes in France where San Bernadette had her Marian Spirits apparitions. Having this spiritual connection to a woman who saw in person the religious spirits only adds to the experience and allows for a deeper understanding of the faith.

The Oblate Grotto is a famous worship site where thousands visit yearly to receive an experience that cannot be felt on a daily basis. Many people have had their lives and point of view changed as a direct result of the events held here and there will be many, many more in the years to come.

Works Cited

https://www.catholic.org/saints/saint.php?saint_id=1757

San Antonio, Texas: The Oblate Grotto and Shrine to Our Lady of Guadalupe

 

Vulcan Materials Quarry

Vulcan Materials is a mining quarry focused in San Antonio Texas and is the United States’ largest producer of construction aggregates.  From humble beginnings as a family company in 1909, Vulcan has since become a massive powerhouse of building materials spanning several continents on the globe. The huge increase of available building materials made consistent construction accessible to both the common man and the large company. Vulcan is among the few quarries that receive near perfect safety checks on all machines, programs, and procedures year-round. Another bonus to Vulcan is that this quarry leads the push on more environmentally friendly mining practices while still maximizing gains.

Cenotaph Memorial of Alamo Defenders

A Cenotaph is a type of monument built to honor those who are buried elsewhere but focuses mainly on soldiers killed in the line of duty. The Alamo Cenotaph or “The Spirit of Sacrifice”,  commemorates the soldiers who died while defending the Alamo in 1836.  The monument is a free-standing marble statue which bears the soldiers’ bodies and an engraving of all those who participated in the defense on Texas’s side. The Cenotaph bears a staggering 187 names of Alamo defenders and the images of Garrison leaders as well. Recently there has been controversy surrounding the relocation of this monument which sparked fierce debate on both sides.

The Texas Archive War

The Texas Archive war began in March of 1842 when a division of the Mexican army arrived at San Antonio ad demanded the surrender of the town. At the time, the town was not able to resist and reluctantly gave the town.  On the 10th of March, President of Texas, Sam Houston declared an emergency session in fear of the army moving to Austin.  In his fear, he made plans to make Houston the capital of Texas by creating a small band of soldiers to march to Austin and remove the archives. The citizens of Austin, however, were not about to give up their rightful capital and made plans themselves to resist.

Gov. Sam Houston
President of Texas, Sam Houston

The people were taken off guard by the ensemble sent by the President and were forced to surrender their precious Austin archives. As the soldiers were leaving, Austin heroine: Mrs. Angelina B. Eberly, fired a cannon at them. The ensemble was caught off guards and reluctantly gave up the papers to avoid bloodshed.

https://www.tsl.texas.gov/sites/default/files/public/tslac/treasures/images/republic/archwar/angelina.jpg
Mrs. Angelina B. Eberly Firing a Cannon
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Statue of Austin Heroine

Later, in 1889, President Mirabeau B. Lamar replaced Sam Houston and solidified the choice of maintaining Austin as Texas’s sole capitol.

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President of Texas, Mirabeau B. Lamar

Japanese Tea Garden

The Japanese Tea Garden was first conceived when the president of the San Antonio Water Works company, George W. Brackenridge donated a large plot of land to be used as a public park.  The park officially opened to the public in the year 1901. The Tea Garden was well received until the outbreak of war in 1939. Following the attack on Pearl Harbor, anti-Japanese sentiment grew rampant and the owners decided to change the name to the “Chinese Tea Garden” to avoid vandalism.  During May 2007, the Tea Garden underwent dramatic renovation including Koi ponds, waterfalls, and much more. The name returned to its former Japanese title but the sign remains unchanged to this day.